On Love and Poetry

I’ve decided, and this has been decided for a while, that Friday’s blog posts are for creative writing. Not as a chore, but to push myself to share my creative works and to ensure that I am consistently writing new things. I don’t want to get out of the habit of writing little bits and pieces, and having my blog is a great platform to share such things.

It’s a bit funny, but I find I can write about love much easier than anything else, even when I was young and had no experience of romance. I’m not sure why, but it means I find it difficult to write outside of that scope.

I think it’s easy for love to sound beautiful through writing because love, in itself, is already a beautiful thing, not just romantically speaking.

And the world has so many things ready to describe love in a way that helps us understand it, that helps us capture the feeling of it, that helps us want it.

I’ll try to explain this a little better using an example:

I think love is beautiful.

Nature is also beautiful.

Right there we have a million means to capture the essence of love because nature is accessible in a visually descriptive way. Nature is physically beautiful, and this image will help us catch a glimpse of the intangible beauty of love.

Because beauty is such a broad topic, let’s narrow it down further:

What makes love beautiful?

Just one reason of many, I think love is beautiful because it’s selfless. When you love someone you want to show them love, not for your own benefit but for theirs.

What in nature does the same?

The sun. The sun rises for us. Plants, animals, people; we need light and warmth to survive.

If you were writing a poem about love using the sun, you could use words like bask, glow, brighten. You know the happy, relaxed feeling you get when you’re lying in the sun? Like you have no responsibilities and you’re just wrapped in warmth? Bam, there’s a comparison to love right there.

For a more practical example, I wrote this poem a few weeks ago using the ocean as a metaphor.

(I find the beach a brilliant metaphor because there are so many aspects of it we can dwell on, pull apart, find commonalities with. It’s beautiful and terrifying and strong and unknown and vast and – well, it’s many things.)

But this poem: I like poems like it because the reader gets to choose what the metaphor represents. For one reader, it could be about heartbreak, for another a hypocritical friend. I wrote it with something specific in mind, but I’m not going to say you have to read it that way.

At the start of this post I declared Fridays to be about creative writing, and here we are on a Friday with no creative writing to share. But that’s okay, because we’ve been talking about it and it’s been fun.

(As a little note: I don’t think I can encapsulate the entirety of God’s pure, unconditional love with my writing. I don’t think I can properly even fathom the ‘unconditional’ part, let alone just how full the term ‘love’ means in relation to our Heavenly Father. So though I try to understand love through rhymes, words will never be enough.)

Sarah xx

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